New platform for online resolution of pay equity disputes in workplaces ruled by federal reglementation!

When Canadians receive equal pay for work of equal value, our economy is stronger, families prosper and communities flourish. That is why the Government of Canada introduced and passed proactive pay equity legislation for federally regulated workplaces. The Canadian Pay Equity Commissioner, Ms. Karen Jensen, is working with the Canadian Human Rights Commission to ensure public awareness and implementation of the new law’s provisions. The latter set out clear steps for employers to take to proactively achieve pay equity in their workplace. 

To carry out this essential mission for the promotion of equal rights in our society, the Canadian Human Rights Commission has forged an important partnership with the Université de Montréal's Cyberjustice Laboratory, headed by Prof. Karim Benyekhlef.   

This cooperation, under the banner of innovation and access to justice, will allow the Pay Equity Division to improve their support to workplace parties (employees, unions, and employers) in their efforts to comply with the Pay Equity Act by providing them with a platform that includes a full range of information and online dispute resolution services. 

The Cyberjustice Laboratory is responsible for delivering this platform, based on the existing PARLe (Platform to Aid in the Resolution of Litigation electronically) software, which is already being used to resolve tens of thousands of consumer, labor or condominiums disputes online in Quebec, Ontario and Europe.  

 

THIS NEW PLATEFORM WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC IN THE COURSE OF 2021. 

"The Cyberjustice Laboratory is very pleased to participate in this major project for equal rights in Canada. This is a unique opportunity to take advantage of our expertise and our PARLe platform developed over the past few years, and thus meet the needs of today's more connected and nomadic litigants. We hope that this project will continue to inspire other initiatives to improve access to justice in Canada and offer innovative solutions that correspond to today's technological realities. The Laboratory continues to work actively on these issues, notably through the study of artificial intelligence tools as part of the Autonomy Through Cyberjustice Technologies and AI project, says Professor Karim Benyekhlef, Director of the Cyberjustice Laboratory. 

 

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Source :
Valentin Callipel, Head of mission                              
Cyberjustice Laboratory
valentin.callipel@umontreal.ca
514-343-6111 # 2550

 

This content has been updated on 05/19/2021 at 14 h 49 min.